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Streamer Action

In this lesson we will go into specific rig setups and fly combos that you can use when you’re on the water with your Streamer Surge Fly Box Set.

TRANSCRIPT

In this lesson we will go into specific rig setups and fly combos that you can use when you’re on the water with your Streamer Surge Fly Box Set.

Don’t worry if you didn’t purchase the Streamer Surge Box Set at the introductory price. Because if you’re interested in trying Streamer fishing for MONSTER trout, you are still eligible for the members’ discount. Check the shopping section of the Members Portal.

Streamer fishing is exciting because you are constantly moving, retrieving your line, and covering lots of water. It’s also exciting because when a trout hits your Streamer, it feels like a bull is pulling on the other side of the line.

For a refresher on Streamer fishing, just go back to the beginner lesson that covers this exciting fly fishing technique.

But before we dive into specific fly setups, let’s discuss how to set up a Streamer rig to be successful on the water.

Fly Line
You most likely have an all-around floating line on your rod for nymphing and dry fly fishing. This is one scenario when you might want to invest in a fast-sinking head line or a fully weighted line. These lines are designed to sink, bringing your Streamer straight to the feeding zone the minute it hits the water.

Unlike for dry fly fishing or nymphing, we will be using a much shorter, heavier poundage leader setup. The reasoning behind this is that it will help you keep more of your flies when hitting the banks or casting from a boat. It also helps keep the much heavier flies from getting tangled up in your back cast.

Look for a 0-3x fluorocarbon tippet attached to your line. I typically do not Streamer fish with more than 5 feet of tippet off of my line.  

I also like using furled fluorocarbon leaders while Streamer fishing. There are several companies on the market that make these and the great thing about them is you can attach your 3x or 4x tippet to end of these leaders and it will have a breaking point in case you do get into a jam. Most come with a micro swivel that also helps your Streamer turn over easily when you’re making long casts.

After you have attached the leader, attach the Streamer using a Non-Slip Loop Knot. (For a review of knots, check lesson 6 in the beginner tutorials.)

When it comes to choosing a Streamer to fish, there are two main factors to consider—COLOR and SIZE. But how do we do this?

Water Clarity

The clarity of the water that you’re fishing will help determine the right COLOR to use. If the water is dark, dirty, or off-color, start by using a darker pattern. These will put off the best silhouette for the MONSTER trout to attach to.

Great patterns in your box are:
Slump Buster
Meat Whistle
Bunny Leach — Black
Muddy Buddy — Black

What if the water is clear? Then we move on to checking weather conditions.

If it’s a dark, overcast day with rain or other bad weather, stick with the dark patterns.

Great patterns in your box are:
Slump Buster — Olive
Slump Buster — Black
Meat Whistle, #2
Bunny Leach — Black
Sculpzilla
Muddy Buddy — Olive
Muddy Buddy — Black
Sex Dungeon — Olive
Butt Monkey

If it’s a bright and sunny, blue-sky day, use a Streamer that is lighter in color.

Great patterns in your box are:
Slump Buster with Cone — Olive
Bunny Leach — Brown
Zonker — Grizzly
Muddler Minnow
Sculpzilla
Muddy Buddy — Olive
Sex Dungeon — Natural
Butt Monkey

The other thing to consider while selecting your streamer is SIZE. A popular size for MONSTER trout fishing is in the 5” range. It is said that larger Streamers catch larger fish. But if you find that the water you’re fishing is not successful with that larger size, just move over to a smaller pattern.

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