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WHAT IS AN EMERGER FLY?

You might be wondering how to fly fish with emergers or even what an emerger is. We will take a closer look at them in this section when discuss the emerger fly fishing fly patterns.

As a whole, emerger flies, when it comes to fly fishing, is a technique used to simulate emerging insects such as midges, mayflies, and caddis hatching out of the water. As these insects move up the water column to emerge to the surface, they are easy prey for petitory fish like trout.

Aquatic insect larvae that are about to hatch swim to the water's surface to transition into the adult stage of their existence. When they reach the surface of the water, they can break free and attempt to open their wings for the first time in their lives. They are extremely sensitive to fish during this stage, making them easy prey for them.

Where a fly pattern lands in the water column

HOW DO YOU TELL IF A FLY IS AN EMERGER?

Nymphs are typically tied on heavier hooks to thick-wire hooks, and their appearance is intended to replicate, or at the very least indicate, insects in their aquatic phases (larvae, nymphs, pupae). Even the most outlandish attractor nymphs (such as the Gold Bead Prince Nymph) have a recognizable nymph form and can easily distinguish them from other nymphs in the wild.

As a general rule, emergers are typically tied on a straight eye hook. The wings are one to three-fifths the height of the hook shank length, and when hackle is used, it is half the hook gap. The body is tied up to one and a half the bend of the hook, and if a tail is present, it can be as long as one hook shank length.

WANT TO KNOW MORE ABOUT EMERGER FLY PATTERNS?

Click here to find out more about Full Details on Fly Fishing with Emergers

HOW DO YOU USE EMERGER FLIES?

When it comes to fishing with emergers, there are a variety of tactics that you may employ. To give you a taste, here are two of the most used methods: the dry fly dropper and the tight line nymphing technique.

The method you use is entirely up to you and depends on how much experience you have with casting. Additionally, you will want to consider the environment where you will be doing it, as some approaches may be more effective in specific locations.

When you think droppers, you might think Hopper Droppers. But you can use the dropper scenario on more than just hoppers. One of my favorite techniques to fly fish an emerger is to do a two fly setup with a larger stimulator dry fly like a Royal Wolf or a Hot Wing Caddis followed by an emerger about 12 to 14 inches off the tail of the stimulator.

This technique allows you to easily follow the larger dry fly and look for any movement that might be a rising trout. If you see anything, go near the two flies, set the hook, and hold on for some fun.

Recommended to use when fishing in pocket water, the tight line method (also known as tight-line nymphing) describes the technique of using the least amount of fly line on the water and making a direct connection to your flies. Presenting sub-surface flies, this method allows you to control the emerger's exact speed and depth.

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